Flight Topics-   Work Cited
Another factor that acts on an airplane in flight is thrust.  Thrust is the force that propels the
airplane forward.  It is opposed by drag, the force that works against an airplane's motion.  Thrust, like lift, is produced by the plane itself.  The plane's engine, jet engine, or propellers create the force of thrust that "propels" the airplane forward. 
Other things that factor into flight are the stability of the airplane.  This is a factor that involves the positioning of the plane's wings.  To improve stability, the wings of an airplane are specifically angled upward in the shape of a "v".  Bernoulli's Principle also plays a big role with the designing of the wings.  As mentioned before on this page, the airfoil design of an airplane's wings creates an upward net force and the lift needed to oppose gravity.  Bernoulli's Principle states that the speed of a moving fluid increase as the pressure of that same fluid decreases.  This principle is the basis on which the airfoil was invented.
        FORCES ACTING ON                               AIRPLANES
1. Gravity                      3. Drag
counteracted by           counteracted by
2. Lift                             4. Thrust
     HOW AN AIRPLANE FLIES
Air glides across the surfaces of the
airplane.  This air is moving at various
velocities and changes the air
pressure on the bottom and top of theof the airplane.  The air pressure on the wings, that are shaped like airfoils, is especially changed. Because of the air pressure changes, the air above the surface (of the wing) has low pressure which produces
pull
.  The beneath surface has high pressure and produces push.  This difference in air pressure creates lift
and a net force in an upward direction that is great enough to counteract the force of gravity that is pushing down on the airplane.  Gravity is the force that opposes lift.  Lift varies depending upon plane structure, wing angle, and plane speed.  Wing angle and shape change the way air moves across the surface of the wing and results in varying velocities.  For example, the more area that the wing of an airplane has, the faster the air will cross the curved upper part of the wing and flat lower part of the wing.  This greater area creates more lift.  Another force that acts upon an airplane is drag. 
Drag is the force that slows down the airplane.  It is usually in the form of resistance whether it be the air or objects in the air.  Drag can be reduced by streamlining an airplane.  This mean that the manufacturer places slots in the wing of a plane to reduce drag and increase lift. 


Airplanes and other means of air transportation must overcome many forces in order to fly!
Visit:
http://thephysicsofh
anggliding.homeste
ad.com
- to learn about the forces that affect hang gliding
The PHYSICS of FLIGHT
Related to an Airplane
"What is that in the sky... is it a bird... is it Superman...NO, it is an AIRPLANE!"

Airplanes and other means of air transportation must overcome many forces in order to fly!
Visit:
http://thephysicsofh
anggliding.homeste
ad.com
- to learn about the forces that affect hang gliding
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No Lift-  The top of the
shape and the bottom of
the shape are equal
distances and are traveling
at the same speed.  There is
no net force.


Lift-  The top part of the object
is longer than the flat part and
therefore the air traveling over
the curve is traveling faster
than the air traveling along the
flat surface.  The faster air
exerts less force than the air
moving slower on the bottom.
When the two forces are
added together they cancel
out each other and there is
some net force in the direction
up.  This object is called an
airfoil.

Still No Lift-  The top and
bottom of the shape are still
equal in distance even though
they are now curved and have
longer distances.  Also the air
traveling along the top and
bottom are still traveling at
the same speed.  There is no
net force.
No Lift
Still No Lift
- Lift
     HOW AN AIRPLANE FLIES
Air glides across the surfaces of the
airplane.  This air is moving at various
velocities and changes the air
pressure on the bottom and top of theof the airplane.  The air pressure on the wings, that are shaped like airfoils, is especially changed. Because of the air pressure changes, the air above the surface (of the wing) has low pressure which produces
pull
.  The beneath surface has high pressure and produces push.  This difference in air pressure creates lift
and a net force in an upward direction that is great enough to counteract the force of gravity that is pushing down on the airplane.  Gravity is the force that opposes lift.  Lift varies depending upon plane structure, wing angle, and plane speed.  Wing angle and shape change the way air moves across the surface of the wing and results in varying velocities.  For example, the more area that the wing of an airplane has, the faster the air will cross the curved upper part of the wing and flat lower part of the wing.  This greater area creates more lift.  Another force that acts upon an airplane is drag. 
Drag is the force that slows down the airplane.  It is usually in the form of resistance whether it be the air or objects in the air.  Drag can be reduced by streamlining an airplane.  This mean that the manufacturer places slots in the wing of a plane to reduce drag and increase lift. 


Gravity
causes all
objects to
move toward
Earth's core at 9.8 m/s/s
Another factor that acts on an airplane in flight is thrust.  Thrust is the force that propels the
airplane forward.  It is opposed by drag, the force that works against an airplane's motion.  Thrust, like lift, is produced by the plane itself.  The plane's engine, jet engine, or propellers create the force of thrust that "propels" the airplane forward. 
Other things that factor into flight are the stability of the airplane.  This is a factor that involves the positioning of the plane's wings.  To improve stability, the wings of an airplane are specifically angled upward in the shape of a "v".  Bernoulli's Principle also plays a big role with the designing of the wings.  As mentioned before on this page, the airfoil design of an airplane's wings creates an upward net force and the lift needed to oppose gravity.  Bernoulli's Principle states that the speed of a moving fluid increase as the pressure of that same fluid decreases.  This principle is the basis on which the airfoil was invented.
        FORCES ACTING ON                               AIRPLANES
1. Gravity                      3. Drag
counteracted by           counteracted by
2. Lift                             4. Thrust
Gravity/Weight
Drag
Thrust
Lift
Flight Topics-   Work Cited